Category Archives: The Pet Page

Vol. 10, No. 25 – Sept 13 – Sept 26, 2017 – The Pet Page

• A fund raiser for Ventura Police K9 officers’ medical insurance will be held on October 7, 4 to 8pm at the Harbor Cove Café and on the beach. (1867 Spinnaker way at the end). Vendors, raffles, live music ,food and fun for all including the Sunset Glow family fun run, walk, or crawl 5K on the beach. Be sure to visit the Ventura Breeze booth and get a free tennis ball for your dog (or cat).

• The SPAN Thrift Store is providing $10 spays and neuters for low income cat and dog friends.

In the SPAN Thrift Store parking lot 110 N. Olive St. (behind Vons on Main) Friday, September 15th.

Please call to schedule an appointment 584-3823.

Scamp gave herding a try but the sheep just laughed at him.

• New research attempts to answer the question whether sleeping with your furry friend(2) is a bad idea for a good night’s sleep.

While some argue that the doggy snoring will ruin their sleep, others love nothing more than a nighttime cuddle with their buddy. However, science may now have resolved the matter, with a new study suggesting that sleeping with your pet can actually help you get a good night’s sleep.

More than 40 million American households have dogs, with 63% of them considering man’s best friend to also be one of the family. However, no matter how much we love our dogs, that doesn’t allow automatic access into the bedroom.

With this in mind, researchers at the Mayo Clinic decided to look into the effect of dogs on sleep quality, recruiting 40 healthy adults without a sleep disorder to take part with their pets.

Both the participants and their dogs were asked (the dogs were asked?)to wear activity trackers to track their sleeping habits for seven nights when they slept in the same bedroom.

The team found that regardless of the size of the dog, sleeping with a furry friend “in the room” helped some people sleep better.

However, having a dog “on the bed” didn’t have the same effect, finding that those who let their canines get too cozy did it at the expense of a good night’s sleep.

“The relationship between people and their pets has changed over time, which is likely why many people in fact do sleep with their pets in the bedroom,” stated Dr. Krahn of the Mayo Clinic. “Today, many pet owners are away from their pets for much of the day, so they want to maximize their time with them when they are home. Having them in the bedroom at night is an easy way to do that. And, now, pet owners can find comfort knowing it won’t negatively impact their sleep.”

• Extracted from article by Cesar Millan:

Intelligent and energetic, Border collies are champion herders — but they aren’t for everyone when it comes to ideal dogs.

All modern Border collies originate from one dog, Old Hemp, who was born in 1893 and sired over 200 offspring. The name comes right from their origins: The border part comes from where they were initially bred in Northumberland, on the border of Scotland and England; the collie part comes from the Celtic word colley, meaning useful or faithful.

Herding dogs originated with the Romans, who brought them to the British Isles, but since the original dogs were from Northern Africa, they couldn’t handle the cold as well. Eventually, invading Vikings bred their dogs with the existing crosses between larger Roman and smaller British dogs. By the 16th century, these cross-breedings had led to various herding dogs, such as the rough collie, Shetland sheepdog, and bearded collie.

They are incredibly intelligent and are often listed among the smartest breeds of dog. They can learn to understand a large number of words, as well as hand gestures and whistles. The downside, of course, is that they can become easily bored or frustrated if they don’t receive proper mental stimulation. More than breed groups, herding dogs need jobs in order to feel fulfilled, which is why things like agility or herding training can be so useful for them.

Because of their skills at learning human words for objects quickly, Border collies have been studied by linguists, who have determined that they have communication skills that even our closest primate relatives don’t. The Border collie Chaser is said to have the largest vocabulary of any non-human animal, at a thousand words.

Border collies are famous for the “crouch” and the “stare” — their ability to move while staying low to the ground, and the intense look they will give to the animals they’re herding in order to control them. And if you have a Border collie, you may have found yourself the subject of the stare at some point, particularly if you were eating.

They’re not just for herding. Border collies can also excel at doing search and rescue work, as therapy dogs, and as… “goose masters,” trained to chase away geese, such as used at the University of Northern Florida.

The breed has been popular with royalty and celebrities over the years.

Vol. 10, No. 24 – Aug 30 – Sept 12, 2017 – The Pet Page

• Dog friendly downtown restaurants. Between Ventura Ave. and Fir and Poli and Thompson
Winchesters Grill & Saloon
Fluid State
Ventiki Tiki Lounge
SavoryThai Cuisine
Rice
Snapper Jacks Taco Shack
Rumfish Y Vino
Paradise Pantry- tables on sidewalk
Taqueria Vallarta
El Ray Cantina
Capriccio-on sidewalk
Coconut Crab
Grapes & Hops
Busy Bee- tables on sidewalk
Cafe Fiore
Pizza Man Dan
The Tavern
Tonys Pizzeria
Banzai Marina
Barrel House101
The Habit
Sandbox Coffee
Steak & Hoagie
Harvest Cafe
Amigos Cantina
Natures Grill- tables on sidewalk
TAJ- on sidewalk
Jimmy’s Slice- tables on sidewalk

• SPAN Thrift Store is providing $10 spays and neuters for low income cat and dog friends.

In the SPAN Thrift Store parking lot 110 N. Olive St. (behind Vons on Main) Friday, September 15th. Please call to schedule an appointment 584-3823.

Also in the Albert Soliz Library parking lot on August 31.
2820 Jourdan St. Oxnard

The Bouvier des Flandres is a herding dog.

• Sept.25 until Oct.1-Bouvier des Flandres Dog Club show at the San Miguel Hall at Seaside Park.
www.SCBDFC.com for more information.

• Well-trained guide dogs are important for visually impaired people who rely on them. But many puppies bred to be guide dogs flunk out of training programs.

A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the way a puppy’s mother raises it may be the key to the dog’s success, or failure. A research team at the University of Pennsylvania found that puppies destined for guide dog training are more likely to fail if they’re coddled by their mothers.

“Surprisingly, there’s not a lot of research about mothering behavior in dogs,” says lead author Emily Bray.

Past studies on rodents and primates have found that, in general, active mothering is better than no mothering. “So, on one hand, we’d think ‘Yes, you need your mother. Mothering should be a good thing.’ But for guide dogs, the mothers are with their puppies in the pen 24/7. So then the question becomes ‘What exactly is beneficial?’ ”

The answer, at least for guide dogs, appears to be what Bray describes as a hands-off style. (Or, paws-off style?)

Showing a dog at a Seaside Park dog event by Murray Robertson.

They found that among the 98 puppies they studied, the actively-mothered ones were more likely to fail a guide dog training program later.

How mothers nurse their puppies also affected how puppies performed. The mothers will either lie down to nurse, or sit or stand up. If the mother dog is sitting or standing, “she’s further from the puppy.

The training for guide dogs teaches and selects for a very specific set of skills. “You’re looking for dogs that are very compliant, very, very relaxed, not at all thrown off by any kind of strange occurrences,” says Clive Wynne, a professor of psychology at Arizona State .

The dogs also need to be “sufficiently driven to learn and tackle tasks,” says Bray, and capable of limited disobedience in order to, for example, disobey a command that would put their handler in danger.

Bray thinks that one reason hands-off mothering is associated with more of these traits could be that the little challenges in puppyhood prepare them for the bigger challenges of being a guide dog.

Another possibility is that maternal stress could affect puppy development. Previous research has found higher levels of the stress-related hormone cortisol in dogs with more active parenting behaviors.

Still another possibility is that specific mothering behaviors may not be the primary cause of the observations. It may be more about genetics. The authors point out that high-performing guide dogs are chosen to breed.

Wynne, who was not involved with the research, thinks the findings shouldn’t be applied broadly, even to other working dogs. “I think what we have here is a special effect of working with guide dog populations, and not necessarily true of all dogs or all animals,” he says. Two previous studies on military working dogs and other dogs have found the opposite effect: that more anxious mothers produce more successful offspring in those contexts.

He thinks research like this might help increase the effectiveness and efficiency of training. “So, it’s very powerful and useful,” he says.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

• How can pet dogs exercise their sense of smell? “Take a smell walk with them.” Dr. Horowitz said. “Let them lead the way and smell and linger. Let them sniff each other. There’s a pleasure for owners in letting a dog be a dog, to acknowledge their dogness. They put up with a lot of our humanness.”

Vol. 10, No. 23 – Aug 16 – Aug 29, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  At the end of a road
By Mary-Jo Murphy

“Does anyone want a dog? Tim’s going to shoot that Border Collie.”

I was on a road trip, 40 miles off Highway 80 in Nevada, wandering around a historic site where Mark Twain had tried his hand at silver mining. The woman was delivering mail and an opportunity that changed my life.

Tim, in turn, promised not shoot her.

Tim lived in a run-down trailer. Tragically widowed months before when his wife died in an off-road vehicle accident, he already had two Border Collies when his stepdaughter abandoned another. Tim’s work took him away for days at a time. The one-year old pup was more than an inconvenience, and it was clear that arranging a rescue was beyond this grieving man.

Another dog was the last thing on my mind. Back home, I had only Karl, a Shepherd-Pitt Bull mix. I was in no hurry to fill the emptiness left by Pumpkin, a goofy, willful Labrador.

I can’t be responsible for every dog in trouble, I told myself as I reluctantly made my way across the dirt road, biscuit in hand. I was prepared to resist. After all, not all dogs are a match.

Approaching the chain-linked enclosure I noticed her nose was bloody. Tim explained, somewhat annoyed, that the doomed dog had just gotten into the garbage. I concluded she had found the trash preferable to the contents of her food bowl, a combination of unnatural shades.

Classically beautiful, her brown eyes made intense contact that I was later to learn was natural for the breed. I spoke quietly to her, offering the treat through the fence. She showed no interest.

Her gaze remained strong, but she offered no response to my overtures. Taken by her elegance but torn by reluctance, hers and mine, I reached my fingers between the metal fence. I wanted to touch her, to reassure her that though I might not be her liberator, I was at least friendly.

As I did, she moved close to my outstretched hand, resting her neck contentedly against my welcoming caress.
“I can’t take her now. I’ll come back for her. I promise.”
Tim, in turn, promised not shoot her.

All the way to Cheyenne, anxious thoughts filled my brain. At the first opportunity, I called Tim. “Is she still there? I am coming back for her.”
Tears of relief filled my eyes as I heard his monotone reply.
“She’s here.”

A week later, on the deserted road toward Unionville, I felt jumpy. What if Tim hadn’t kept his promise? What if…?

Ten years later the what-ifs still echo. What if I hadn’t decided to explore Samuel Clemens’ historical site? What if I had arrived a few hours later? What if the postal woman hadn’t been delivering her mail at that exact moment? What if Sam hadn’t been there at the end of the road, wagging her tail, joyfully greeting me on my return?
No need to ask. We forever dog owners know how this works.

• With National Homeless Animals Day approaching and the cost of owning a pet ranging from $227 to more than $2,000, depending on the type of animal, WalletHub (A website)took an in-depth look at 2017’s Most Pet-Friendly Cities.

In order to determine where Americans’ furry and slimy companions can enjoy the best quality of life without breaking the bank, WalletHub’s analysts compared the creature-friendliness of the 100 largest cities across 21 key metrics. The data set ranges from minimum pet-care provider rate per visit to pet businesses per capita to walkability.

Most Pet-Friendly Cities Least Pet-Friendly Cities
1 Scottsdale, AZ 91 Charlotte, NC
2 Phoenix, AZ 92 Anchorage, AK
3 Tampa, FL 93 Philadelphia, PA
4 San Diego, CA 94 Buffalo, NY
5 Orlando, FL 95 Santa Ana, CA
6 Birmingham, AL 96 Boston, MA
7 Austin, TX 97 New York, NY
8 Cincinnati, OH 98 Honolulu, HI
9 Atlanta, GA 99 Baltimore, MD
10 Las Vegas, NV 100 Newark, NJ
Key Stats
Columbus, Ohio, has the lowest average veterinary care costs (per visit), $33.25, which is 2.5 times lower than in New York, the city with the highest at $84.47.

Miami, Florida, has the most veterinarians (per square root of population), 88 times more than in Newark, New Jersey, the city with the fewest.

St. Paul, Minnesota, has the lowest monthly dog-insurance premium, $33.71, which is 2.4 times lower than in New York, the city with the highest at $80.78.

San Francisco, California, has the most pet businesses (per square root of population), 23 times more than in Laredo, Texas the city with the fewest.
Of course Ventura would have been number one if we were a bigger city!

To view the full report and your city’s rank, please visit:
https://wallethub.com/edu/most-pet-friendly-cities/5562/

• Biggest Adoption Event of 2017! Clear The Shelters
Saturday, August 19, 2017 (10AM – 6PM)
Camarillo Animal Shelter & Simi Valley Animal Shelter
To find homes for every homeless dog and cat!
Each $20 dog and cat adoption comes with $998 worth of services, gifts and coupons. An additional $20 pet license fee may apply.

• Is wagging related to smell?

Yes. Many of a dog’s identifying smells are in the anal glands. Those sacs transmit how a dog is feeling — anxious? playful? — and the essence of who the dog is. To greet one another dogs wag, basically dispensing their personal odors from their rumps.”

Researchers have found that dogs have 300 million olfactory receptors, compared with about six million for humans. No wonder they can smell a hot dog several blocks away.

• On Sunday, September 24, from 9am-noon an Animal Career Fair will be held at Ventura Pet Wellness & Dog Training Center located at 3521 Arundell Circle #B in Ventura. This event is free to the public!

Are you interested in a career with animals but aren’t sure what is available or how to get into the field? Attend the Animal Career Fair where you can meet animal professionals from different fields and ask questions about their careers.

Vol. 10, No. 22 – Aug 2 – Aug 15, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  Estella had her successful surgery yesterday and is recovering nicely. She is still at VetSurg, but will go home with her foster mom tomorrow for full recuperation.

We raised the needed $6,000 … thanks in huge part to The Breeze. Money poured in from your readers ……. you are truly a Buddy Nation Angel! THANK YOU!

Estella sends you a big sloppy kiss … the rest of us send you hugs.

Cappi Patterson

•  VA Doberman Study

by Victoria Usher

Recently, The West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center decided to halt planning for tests on narcoleptic dogs. The experiment would have involved giving antidepressants or methamphetamine to eighteen narcoleptic Dobermans. The Dobermans would have been killed after they were given the drugs and then studied to see how the drugs had affected the production of histamines in their brains.

An animal rights group known as White Coat Waste Project heard about this appalling experiment and discussed it further with lawmakers. After much discussion about it being completely unnecessary and inhumane we should all be happy to hear that it looks like the experiment is no longer going to happen!

•  What makes dogs so friendly? Study finds genetic link to super-outgoing people

by Elizabeth PennisiJul

It’s one of the biggest perks of being a dog owner: Your pooch is thrilled when you come home, wagging its tail, wiggling its body, and licking you with its tongue. Now, scientists say they have pinned down the genetic basis of this affection. Using clues from humans with a genetic disorder that makes them unusually friendly, the team found variations in several genes that make dogs more affable than wolves and some dogs friendlier than others.

The study shows that the genetics of dog behavior “might be even more relevant for understanding genetics of human behavior than we once thought,” says Per Jensen, a behavioral geneticist from Linköping University in Sweden who was not involved with the research.

Over the past decade, geneticists have discovered the DNA involved in key dog traits, such as size and coat variation. Some DNA seems linked to personality, and one study showed that dogs and humans enforce their bonds by gazing at each other. But few studies have pinned particular behaviors to specific genes. “There’s been a remarkable explosion of studies, with the exception of behavioral studies,” says Robert Wayne, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not involved with the work.

Seven years ago, Monique Udell, an animal behaviorist at Oregon State University in Corvallis, and Princeton University geneticist Bridgett vonHoldt joined forces to link genes to a behavioral trait they think was pivotal to dog domestication: hypersociability. Researchers already know that dogs are hypersocial compared with wolves, and the team confirmed this by comparing the behavior of 18 dogs—some purebreds, others mixed breeds—with 10 captive, hand-raised wolves at a research and education institute in Indiana. As others had shown, the dogs were much friendlier than the wolves, even though the wolves had been raised by people. Both hand-raised wolves and dogs greet human visitors, but dogs continue to interact with people much longer than wolves do, even when visited by a stranger.

“The study is exciting because it provides such strong support for the ‘survival of the friendliest’” hypothesis of dog domestication, says Brian Hare, an evolutionary anthropologist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. “Fear was replaced by friendliness and a new social partner was created.”

“In a sense, this is the first paper discovering the genes related to the high sociability of dogs,” says Takefumi Kikusui, an animal behaviorist at Azabu University in Sagamihara, Japan. Humans too have high sociability relative to other primates. “Probably, these two species, namely human and dogs, use the same genes for these social behaviors.”

However, some experts think the study needs to be expanded to more dogs and wolves to be sure of the conclusions. With so few individuals “the associations are at most suggestive at this point,” Jensen says. Kikusui suggests they look for this gene-behavior connection in other populations of dogs and more individuals.

•  From another study:

Being friendly is in dogs’ nature and could be key to how they came to share our lives, say US scientists.

Dogs evolved from wolves tens of thousands of years ago. Dogs were domesticated from wolves between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.

This process began when wolves that were tolerant of humans sneaked into hunter gatherer camps to feed on food scraps. Over the course of history, wolves were eventually tamed and became the dogs we know today, which come in all shapes and sizes. The finding of genetic changes linked to sociability in dogs shows how their friendly behavior might have evolved.

During this time, certain genes that make dogs particularly gregarious have been selected for, according to research. This may give dogs their distinctive personalities, including a craving for human company.

“Our finding of genetic variation in both dogs and wolves provides a possible insight into animal personality, and may even suggest similar genes may have roles in other domestic species .” said Dr Bridgett vonHoldt of Princeton University.

The researchers studied the behavior of domestic dogs, and grey wolves living in captivity. They carried out a number of tests of the animals’ skills at problem-solving and sociability.

These showed that wolves were as good as dogs at solving problems, such as retrieving pieces of sausage from a plastic lunchbox. But captive wolves gave humans only brief attention

Dogs, however, were much more friendly. They spent more time greeting human strangers and gazing at them, while wolves were somewhat aloof (sounds like cats evolved from wolves).

DNA tests found a link between certain genetic changes and behaviors such as attentiveness to strangers or picking up on social cues. Similar changes in humans are associated with a rare genetic syndrome, where people are highly sociable.

The research is published in the journal, Science Advances.

•  Many veterinarians and dog folks may not know about Border Collie collapse, a form of exercise intolerance in Border Collies, Australian Kelpies, and related breeds. Dogs with BCC are normal at rest, but after five to 15 minutes of strenuous exercise, they can develop incoordination and altered mentation.

Two issues of the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association featured a study on exercise in dogs with BCC and a survey on observations of dogs with the condition.

“(BCC) is not rare and is a significant problem in the breed,” said lead researcher Dr. Sue Taylor, a professor of small animal medicine at the University of Saskatchewan Western College of Veterinary Medicine, in the newsletter AAHA NEWStat.

The only treatment for BCC is to avoid strenuous exercise, especially in hot weather, as a form of prevention. Exercise should be stopped as soon as a dog shows the first signs of a collapse, and dogs with signs should be cooled.

Vol. 10, No. 21 – July 19 – Aug 1, 2017 – The Pet Page

Search Dog Trapper lived life to the fullest, enjoying every moment, whether searching for survivors after Hurricane Katrina or playing in the backyard swimming pool. This handsome Yellow Lab crossed the Rainbow Bridge at 15 years old on June 22 with his Handler of nearly 13 years, Marshia Hall, by his side.

•The British Veterinary Association reported nearly 11,000 UK pet poisoning incidents last year, with e-cigarette materials high in nicotine as a threat on the rise. Vitamin D tablet poisonings were also up, with rat poison, chocolate and artificial sweeteners also on the list.

We want to thank Cappi Patterson and Mary-Joe Murphy for these wonderful commemorative cups dedicated to Scamp.

•David Krall nearly died after he was infected with Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a rare bacteria that can be transmitted to people from dog saliva, when he was bitten by a neighbor’s dog, and although he’s recovered, he was left with partially amputated toes, hearing loss and other deficits. Krall’s condition, which was plagued by a series of mistakes and misinformation and was complicated by the fact that his spleen had been removed two decades earlier, left him in a medically induced coma for over a week.

•By Victoria Usher

The sense of fair play is an important human trait, but new research suggests that it’s a key behavior for dogs and wolves as well. This new research with wolves suggests that this aversion to unfairness predates the domestication of dogs. Scientists tested similarly raised dogs and wolves that lived in packs. Two animals of each species were placed in adjacent cages, equipped with a buzzer apparatus.

When the dog or wolf pressed it with their paw, both animals got a reward on some occasions. Other times, the dog or wolf doing the task got nothing while the partner did. The key finding was that when the partner got a high value treat, the animal doing the task refused to continue with it. “When the inequity was greatest they stopped working,” said Jennifer Essler, from the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna. “The fact that the behavior was found in both wolves and dogs helps to overturn the idea that dogs learned this concept because they were domesticated. It makes much more sense to say that this would be something shared from a common ancestor than to say it evolved twice, or to say that it came from domestication.”

Pet dogs are less sensitive to being treated unfairly – probably because of their experience with humans. “I think it’s clear that this is affected by both domestication as well as their life experience with humans because you do see a difference between pet dogs and pack-living dogs,” said Essler.

•Dear Dr. Weldy’s: My fiancé and I have been shopping for a new puppy, but after speaking to some friends of ours, we are blown away at the cost of veterinary care. We don’t think that we’ll move ahead with getting a puppy because the necessary care and surgery costs aren’t in our budget. Why is it so expensive to visit the vet?!

Bremen

Dear Bremen: I’m so glad you asked! You aren’t wrong, and we sympathize with you — veterinary care is not cheap, and unplanned veterinary care can be financially straining. A simple answer to your question would be to say that your veterinarian is part of a business and businesses need to generate income. But, there’s more that we in the veterinary field would like you to know.

This conversation should be prefaced by saying that everyone at your vet clinic cares about your pet. The hustle and chaos may distract from it, but those individuals are extremely hard working and they’ve dedicated their lives to ensuring the betterment of you and your pet’s lives.

The obvious holds true — veterinary clinics are commercial entities with large utility bills and lots of overhead. Additionally, medications, surgical instruments, x-rays, ultrasounds, etc., all cost a lot of money to purchase and maintain. Most importantly, though, vet clinics charge what they charge so that veterinarians, receptionists, nurses, and support staff can continue to keep pets healthy. What many people don’t understand is that the amount of money that a clinic generates rarely reflects the enormous amounts of work, education, sacrifice, blood, sweat, and tears that go into a regular day on the job.

This is well-illustrated by comparing veterinary medicine to human medicine. Veterinarians have very similar training to physicians on the human side — four years of college followed by four years of veterinary school. And many veterinarians go on to specialize, just like medical doctors. That education comes at a price for everyone; vets and physicians graduate with a similar amount of debt (approaching $200,000 for recent graduates). However, veterinarians make anywhere from a quarter to half of what physicians make.

Meanwhile, veterinary nurses and assistants (arguably the hardest working and most caring members of the veterinary team) are also suffering from a large debt-to-income ratio. Though many people are aware of the education required for vets, very few realize that many of the nurses they see at the vet have two-year, and sometimes four-year degrees. Despite their education and on-the-job training, most veterinary nurses make half (at best) of what their human counterparts bring in. The same holds true for all support staff involved. They are all extremely qualified individuals who work very hard to bring you and your animals better lives.

I haven’t pointed all of this out to complain, however. All of us enjoy our work and we’re proud of what we do. We signed up for this. I’ve pointed this out to illustrate that the veterinary team, in many ways, makes a financial sacrifice, so that we can all continue to enjoy the love and fulfillment our animals bring.

Questions for Ask a Vet can be asked either by email to drweldys@frontier.com, by regular mail to Dr. Weldy’s Associates, 114 N. Elkhart, P.O. Box 527, Wakarusa, IN 46573, or by visiting the website at www.drweldys.com.

Vol. 10, No. 20 – July 5 – July 18, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  Estella is a sweet, affectionate 2 year old Pit Bull. She and her human are homeless and are being helped by Buddy Nation. Buddy Nation is a registered 501(c)(3) organization devoted to helping the pets of Ventura’s homeless, including veterinary care.

Estella needs your help

Estella is going lame and losing the use of her back legs. She needs double ACL surgery – Anterior Cruciate Ligament. Her surgery is scheduled for the end of July and will be done by Dr. Ian Holsworth of VetSurg. Although VetSurg has given a discount, the estimated cost will be $6,000. Buddy Nation has raised about half that amount.

Please donate if you can, in any amount. All monies should go directly to VetSurg, marked for Estella/Buddy Nation. VetSurg – 2180, 2859 Loma Vista Road.

•  The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office Detention Services Division launched a new interactive inmate program named ‘R.U.F.F. Road” (Rehabilitation Utilizing Furry Friends) in January ,2017. The 16-week collaborative program allows inmates who are instructed by expert dog trainers to train shelter dogs in preparation for adoption.

The Sheriff’s Office has established a partnership with Pivot Animal Assisted Education Outreach, a non-profit organization that aims to give dogs facing euthanasia at local shelters a second chance by providing them training that makes them more adoptable. The inmates will teach basic obedience, house training, and socialization skills through positive reinforcement.

This program allows inmates a chance to give back to their community by training dogs to be well-behaved American Kennel Club Good Citizen Pets. While the dogs learn good behavior, trust, and skills that improve their adoption chances, the inmate’s gains patience, confidence, self-pride, communication and job skills.

Pivot is one example of many organizations willing to work tirelessly to find and save last chance shelter dogs using inmates in county jails.

On June 21 the Ventura County Sheriff’s office held the inaugural graduation ceremony for the canine training program. The event was held at the Todd Road Jail Facility. The guests of honor were dogs Brando, Buddy, Chance and Lipit.

For more information about Pivot, please visit www.pivotareo.org.

•  Gavel the Puppy (Vice-Regal Dog) and Fair Play

By Victoria Usher

“Can you believe that I was fired because I was too friendly” Gavel

In Queensland, Australia the title of Vice-Regal Dog has been given to a German Shepard puppy who goes by the name of Gavel. He was originally enrolled in a police dog academy with the Queensland Police Service but he was kicked out of the 16-month program early for being too friendly and now he is known as one of the fanciest dogs in the world. Aren’t dogs supposed to be friendly?

Since April of 2016, Gavel has been living at the official residence of the Queensland Governor, where the Governor himself decided to give Gavel a job that was perfect for him and his friendly personality.

“He has outgrown four ceremonial coats, undergone a career change and brought untold joy to the lives of the Governor, Mrs. de Jersey, Government House staff, and the thousands of Queenslanders who have since visited the estate,” the office of Governor Paul de Jersey stated. Since Gavel’s promotion to Vice-Regal Dog became official in February, he has been working hard welcoming guests and playing with tour groups at the Governor’s house and the office at the Governor’s house has also begun posting photos of Gavel’s best moments on social media. “We hope Gavel is with us for a long, long time into the future.”

Proud dogs and trainers at new interactive Ventura County Sheriff’s inmate program. Photos by Michael Gordon

•  16 years old Sherlock Patterson has passed away. A great little Doxie, rescued from a hoarder/breeder, born blind due to inbreeding, but that never stopped him … he raced down the back steps into the yard and traveled to New York and San Francisco without a misstep. Sherlock is very missed by his family – 2 and 4 footed.

Vol. 10, No. 20 – July 5 – July 18, 2017 – The Pet Page

Fotos: Proud dogs and trainers at new interactive Ventura County Sheriff’s inmate program. Photos by Michael Gordon

“ Can you believe that I was fired because I was too friendly” Gavel

From June 29th to July 2 the Seaside Spectacular All Breed Dog Show was held at the Fairgrounds. These are a few of the adorable dogs that showed their stuff.

Estella needs your help.

•Estella is a sweet, affectionate 2 year old Pit Bull. She and her human are homeless and are being helped by Buddy Nation. Buddy Nation is a registered 501(c)(3) organization devoted to helping the pets of Ventura’s homeless, including veterinary care.

Estella is going lame and losing the use of her back legs. She needs double ACL surgery – Anterior Cruciate Ligament. Her surgery is scheduled for the end of July and will be done by Dr. Ian Holsworth of VetSurg. Although VetSurg has given a discount, the estimated cost will be $6,000. Buddy Nation has raised about half that amount.

Please donate if you can, in any amount. All monies should go directly to VetSurg, marked for Estella/Buddy Nation. VetSurg – 2180, 2859 Loma Vista Road.

•The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office Detention Services Division launched a new interactive inmate program named ‘R.U.F.F. Road” (Rehabilitation Utilizing Furry Friends) in January ,2017. The 16-week collaborative program allows inmates who are instructed by expert dog trainers to train shelter dogs in preparation for adoption.

The Sheriff’s Office has established a partnership with Pivot Animal Assisted Education Outreach, a non-profit organization that aims to give dogs facing euthanasia at local shelters a second chance by providing them training that makes them more adoptable. The inmates will teach basic obedience, house training, and socialization skills through positive reinforcement.

This program allows inmates a chance to give back to their community by training dogs to be well-behaved American Kennel Club Good Citizen Pets. While the dogs learn good behavior, trust, and skills that improve their adoption chances, the inmate’s gains patience, confidence, self-pride, communication and job skills.

Pivot is one example of many organizations willing to work tirelessly to find and save last chance shelter dogs using inmates in county jails.

On June 21 the Ventura County Sheriff’s office held the inaugural graduation ceremony for the canine training program. The event was held at the Todd Road Jail Facility. The guests of honor were dogs Brando, Buddy, Chance and Lipit.

For more information about Pivot, please visit www.pivotareo.org.

•Gavel the Puppy (Vice-Regal Dog) and Fair Play

By Victoria Usher

In Queensland, Australia the title of Vice-Regal Dog has been given to a German Shepard puppy who goes by the name of Gavel. He was originally enrolled in a police dog academy with the Queensland Police Service but he was kicked out of the 16-month program early for being too friendly and now he is known as one of the fanciest dogs in the world. Aren’t dogs supposed to be friendly?

Since April of 2016, Gavel has been living at the official residence of the Queensland Governor, where the Governor himself decided to give Gavel a job that was perfect for him and his friendly personality.

“He has outgrown four ceremonial coats, undergone a career change and brought untold joy to the lives of the Governor, Mrs. de Jersey, Government House staff, and the thousands of Queenslanders who have since visited the estate,” the office of Governor Paul de Jersey stated. Since Gavel’s promotion to Vice-Regal Dog became official in February, he has been working hard welcoming guests and playing with tour groups at the Governor’s house and the office at the Governor’s house has also begun posting photos of Gavel’s best moments on social media. “We hope Gavel is with us for a long, long time into the future.”

•16 years old Sherlock Patterson has passed away. A great little Doxie, rescued from a hoarder/breeder, born blind due to inbreeding, but that never stopped him … he raced down the back steps into the yard and traveled to New York and San Francisco without a misstep. Sherlock is very missed by his family – 2 and 4 footed.

Vol. 10, No. 19 – June 21 – July 4, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  SPAN is providing $10 spays and neuters for low income cat and dog friends. In the SPAN Thrift Store parking lot 110 N. Olive St. (behind Vons on Main) Friday, July 14, Please call to schedule an appointment 584-3823.

•  On Thursday, June 22, the Housing Authority of the City of San Buenaventura (HACSB) will accept Pet Sitters International’s challenge to “Make it your business to help pets in need” by joining companies around the globe in opening their doors to employees’ furry, four-legged best friends for the PSI’s 19th annual Take Your Dog To Work Day (TYDTWDay®).

TYDTWDay was established by Pet Sitters International (PSI) in 1999. This annual event urges businesses around the globe to experience the joys of dogs in the workplace .

The Housing Authority of the City of San Buenaventura anticipates 7 dogs to join them on June 22 and has a variety of activities planned to give everyone a fun “paws” at work. For more information on PSI’s Take Your Dog To Work Day, visit www.takeyourdog.com.

•  Dogs and memory by Victoria Usher

The question for researchers in a recent study published in Current Biology is whether other animals besides humans share the ability for episodic-like memory. For their study, the research group in Budapest, Hungary, enlisted the help of 17 pet dogs. The dogs in this study were energetic participants who were all easily trained to imitate a simple action.

After watching their owners perform a series of actions the dogs were given the command “lie down”. Replacing the expectation to imitate with lying down had to be unexpected and the researchers tried to verify this new expectation in two ways. First, the dogs received training until they would reliably lie down after observing the actions. Second, verifying that the dogs acted surprised when they didn’t receive a “lie down” request.

Next, instead of the now expected “lie down”, one minute after the dogs saw the last action they received the command to “do it”. Nose to umbrella, paw on the chair, most of the dogs imitated their owner’s action.

To see if they remembered the action after a longer delay the dogs left the testing area for an hour before coming back for a second try. Many dogs successfully imitated the action again, though fewer then after the one-minute test. These results, one of a handful suggesting episodic-like memory in a non-human species, add to our growing knowledge of the richness of other animal’s mental lives. The dog cognition lab in Budapest is one of many around the world; pups in Connecticut can go participate at Yale University and dogs in North Carolina can help at Duke University. Dogs share our homes and our work, and now we know they might share some of the rich memories of our lives together.

•  RedRover, a national animal welfare organization dedicated to moving animals out of crisis and into care, has a list of summer safety tips for pets to help get families through the warm months.

Surfaces such as asphalt, sand and concrete can burn your pet’s paws. Try to walk your pet early in the morning or later in the evening as the temperature cools down or walk them on the grass. If that isn’t possible, check the ground temperature by placing the back of your hand on the ground for at least 10 seconds. If it’s too hot for your hand, it is too hot for your pet’s paws.

Leaving your pet in your car, even in 70 degree weather, can lead to deadly consequences. A Stanford study found that a car’s interior can heat up by an average of 40 degrees within an hour, regardless of ambient temperature, and 80 percent of the temperature rise occurs within the first half-hour.

Make sure to check your pet’s water dish several times a day, and refill it with fresh, cool water. Ice cubes or frozen broth cubes can be added to encourage them to drink more. Adding wet food to their diet can also keep them hydrated.

In addition to making sure your pet is hydrated, keep them in the shade as often as possible when outdoors. While dogs and cats like to bask in the sun, direct sunlight can overheat them and cause heat stroke.

While pools can be a great way to cool your dog down and prevent heat stroke, chlorine can upset a dog’s stomach and irritate their skin. Watch to make sure they don’t drink more than a mouthful of water, and don’t forget to rinse your dog with fresh water after their swim.

Loud noises can be very scary for animals. Try to keep your pet indoors when you know fireworks are planned. If you can’t, be sure to double-check your gate/fencing to ensure your pet won’t try to escape when startled.

Animals can sunburn too, especially those with short, thin or light-colored coats. Sunburns can be painful, and overexposure to the sun can lead to skin cancer. Ask your veterinarian about animal-safe sunscreens and how to apply them properly.

Food that is stuck to a barbecue after cooking can be too tempting for your pet to resist – licking the barbecue grate can result in serious burns to an animal’s tongue or mouth. Make sure to clean the grill thoroughly and close the lid, if possible.

These are just a few tips to help make the summer months with your pets enjoyable and safe. For more information on RedRover and its programs and services, please visit www.RedRover.orgDogs & Wolves –

Cabrillo plans affordable housing tour

To provide awareness of the critical need for affordable housing in Ventura County, Cabrillo Economic Development Corporation is hosting its first-ever Affordable Housing Bus Tour as part of its 35th Anniversary Celebration and NeighborWorks Week activities.

The tour, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 8, will make stops at four diverse Cabrillo properties, including an innovative LEED certified property, a transformed farmworker property, family housing and a senior property.

In regions like Ventura County, housing costs are among the highest in the nation. The latest median income figure for Ventura County is $88,300 with an average rent of just more than $1,800 per month. Cost-burdened residents struggle to make ends meet, and as a community leader, Cabrillo is doing its best to make people aware of this plight.

Tour attendees will include elected and city officials, business professionals, Cabrillo community partners and media.

Check-in will be at 10 a.m. at Snapdragon Place Apartments, 11094 Snapdragon St., Ventura (parking available). At each stop, attendees will be able to tour the properties and hear about the various aspects of Cabrillo’s mission.

At  12:30 p.m. you will be at the Azahar Place Apartments, 111370 Mimosa St., Ventura.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided. For more information or to RSVP, please contact Jeanette Villanueva, Organizational Advancement Manager,  672-2597 or jvillanueva@cabrilloedc.org. Bus seats are limited, and reservations are made on a first-come, first-served basis.