Category Archives: Professor Scamp Ph.D (Pretty Happy Dog)

Vol. 10, No. 23 – Aug 16 – Aug 29, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  At the end of a road
By Mary-Jo Murphy

“Does anyone want a dog? Tim’s going to shoot that Border Collie.”

I was on a road trip, 40 miles off Highway 80 in Nevada, wandering around a historic site where Mark Twain had tried his hand at silver mining. The woman was delivering mail and an opportunity that changed my life.

Tim, in turn, promised not shoot her.

Tim lived in a run-down trailer. Tragically widowed months before when his wife died in an off-road vehicle accident, he already had two Border Collies when his stepdaughter abandoned another. Tim’s work took him away for days at a time. The one-year old pup was more than an inconvenience, and it was clear that arranging a rescue was beyond this grieving man.

Another dog was the last thing on my mind. Back home, I had only Karl, a Shepherd-Pitt Bull mix. I was in no hurry to fill the emptiness left by Pumpkin, a goofy, willful Labrador.

I can’t be responsible for every dog in trouble, I told myself as I reluctantly made my way across the dirt road, biscuit in hand. I was prepared to resist. After all, not all dogs are a match.

Approaching the chain-linked enclosure I noticed her nose was bloody. Tim explained, somewhat annoyed, that the doomed dog had just gotten into the garbage. I concluded she had found the trash preferable to the contents of her food bowl, a combination of unnatural shades.

Classically beautiful, her brown eyes made intense contact that I was later to learn was natural for the breed. I spoke quietly to her, offering the treat through the fence. She showed no interest.

Her gaze remained strong, but she offered no response to my overtures. Taken by her elegance but torn by reluctance, hers and mine, I reached my fingers between the metal fence. I wanted to touch her, to reassure her that though I might not be her liberator, I was at least friendly.

As I did, she moved close to my outstretched hand, resting her neck contentedly against my welcoming caress.
“I can’t take her now. I’ll come back for her. I promise.”
Tim, in turn, promised not shoot her.

All the way to Cheyenne, anxious thoughts filled my brain. At the first opportunity, I called Tim. “Is she still there? I am coming back for her.”
Tears of relief filled my eyes as I heard his monotone reply.
“She’s here.”

A week later, on the deserted road toward Unionville, I felt jumpy. What if Tim hadn’t kept his promise? What if…?

Ten years later the what-ifs still echo. What if I hadn’t decided to explore Samuel Clemens’ historical site? What if I had arrived a few hours later? What if the postal woman hadn’t been delivering her mail at that exact moment? What if Sam hadn’t been there at the end of the road, wagging her tail, joyfully greeting me on my return?
No need to ask. We forever dog owners know how this works.

• With National Homeless Animals Day approaching and the cost of owning a pet ranging from $227 to more than $2,000, depending on the type of animal, WalletHub (A website)took an in-depth look at 2017’s Most Pet-Friendly Cities.

In order to determine where Americans’ furry and slimy companions can enjoy the best quality of life without breaking the bank, WalletHub’s analysts compared the creature-friendliness of the 100 largest cities across 21 key metrics. The data set ranges from minimum pet-care provider rate per visit to pet businesses per capita to walkability.

Most Pet-Friendly Cities Least Pet-Friendly Cities
1 Scottsdale, AZ 91 Charlotte, NC
2 Phoenix, AZ 92 Anchorage, AK
3 Tampa, FL 93 Philadelphia, PA
4 San Diego, CA 94 Buffalo, NY
5 Orlando, FL 95 Santa Ana, CA
6 Birmingham, AL 96 Boston, MA
7 Austin, TX 97 New York, NY
8 Cincinnati, OH 98 Honolulu, HI
9 Atlanta, GA 99 Baltimore, MD
10 Las Vegas, NV 100 Newark, NJ
Key Stats
Columbus, Ohio, has the lowest average veterinary care costs (per visit), $33.25, which is 2.5 times lower than in New York, the city with the highest at $84.47.

Miami, Florida, has the most veterinarians (per square root of population), 88 times more than in Newark, New Jersey, the city with the fewest.

St. Paul, Minnesota, has the lowest monthly dog-insurance premium, $33.71, which is 2.4 times lower than in New York, the city with the highest at $80.78.

San Francisco, California, has the most pet businesses (per square root of population), 23 times more than in Laredo, Texas the city with the fewest.
Of course Ventura would have been number one if we were a bigger city!

To view the full report and your city’s rank, please visit:
https://wallethub.com/edu/most-pet-friendly-cities/5562/

• Biggest Adoption Event of 2017! Clear The Shelters
Saturday, August 19, 2017 (10AM – 6PM)
Camarillo Animal Shelter & Simi Valley Animal Shelter
To find homes for every homeless dog and cat!
Each $20 dog and cat adoption comes with $998 worth of services, gifts and coupons. An additional $20 pet license fee may apply.

• Is wagging related to smell?

Yes. Many of a dog’s identifying smells are in the anal glands. Those sacs transmit how a dog is feeling — anxious? playful? — and the essence of who the dog is. To greet one another dogs wag, basically dispensing their personal odors from their rumps.”

Researchers have found that dogs have 300 million olfactory receptors, compared with about six million for humans. No wonder they can smell a hot dog several blocks away.

• On Sunday, September 24, from 9am-noon an Animal Career Fair will be held at Ventura Pet Wellness & Dog Training Center located at 3521 Arundell Circle #B in Ventura. This event is free to the public!

Are you interested in a career with animals but aren’t sure what is available or how to get into the field? Attend the Animal Career Fair where you can meet animal professionals from different fields and ask questions about their careers.

Vol. 10, No. 22 – Aug 2 – Aug 15, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  Estella had her successful surgery yesterday and is recovering nicely. She is still at VetSurg, but will go home with her foster mom tomorrow for full recuperation.

We raised the needed $6,000 … thanks in huge part to The Breeze. Money poured in from your readers ……. you are truly a Buddy Nation Angel! THANK YOU!

Estella sends you a big sloppy kiss … the rest of us send you hugs.

Cappi Patterson

•  VA Doberman Study

by Victoria Usher

Recently, The West Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Medical Center decided to halt planning for tests on narcoleptic dogs. The experiment would have involved giving antidepressants or methamphetamine to eighteen narcoleptic Dobermans. The Dobermans would have been killed after they were given the drugs and then studied to see how the drugs had affected the production of histamines in their brains.

An animal rights group known as White Coat Waste Project heard about this appalling experiment and discussed it further with lawmakers. After much discussion about it being completely unnecessary and inhumane we should all be happy to hear that it looks like the experiment is no longer going to happen!

•  What makes dogs so friendly? Study finds genetic link to super-outgoing people

by Elizabeth PennisiJul

It’s one of the biggest perks of being a dog owner: Your pooch is thrilled when you come home, wagging its tail, wiggling its body, and licking you with its tongue. Now, scientists say they have pinned down the genetic basis of this affection. Using clues from humans with a genetic disorder that makes them unusually friendly, the team found variations in several genes that make dogs more affable than wolves and some dogs friendlier than others.

The study shows that the genetics of dog behavior “might be even more relevant for understanding genetics of human behavior than we once thought,” says Per Jensen, a behavioral geneticist from Linköping University in Sweden who was not involved with the research.

Over the past decade, geneticists have discovered the DNA involved in key dog traits, such as size and coat variation. Some DNA seems linked to personality, and one study showed that dogs and humans enforce their bonds by gazing at each other. But few studies have pinned particular behaviors to specific genes. “There’s been a remarkable explosion of studies, with the exception of behavioral studies,” says Robert Wayne, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, who was not involved with the work.

Seven years ago, Monique Udell, an animal behaviorist at Oregon State University in Corvallis, and Princeton University geneticist Bridgett vonHoldt joined forces to link genes to a behavioral trait they think was pivotal to dog domestication: hypersociability. Researchers already know that dogs are hypersocial compared with wolves, and the team confirmed this by comparing the behavior of 18 dogs—some purebreds, others mixed breeds—with 10 captive, hand-raised wolves at a research and education institute in Indiana. As others had shown, the dogs were much friendlier than the wolves, even though the wolves had been raised by people. Both hand-raised wolves and dogs greet human visitors, but dogs continue to interact with people much longer than wolves do, even when visited by a stranger.

“The study is exciting because it provides such strong support for the ‘survival of the friendliest’” hypothesis of dog domestication, says Brian Hare, an evolutionary anthropologist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. “Fear was replaced by friendliness and a new social partner was created.”

“In a sense, this is the first paper discovering the genes related to the high sociability of dogs,” says Takefumi Kikusui, an animal behaviorist at Azabu University in Sagamihara, Japan. Humans too have high sociability relative to other primates. “Probably, these two species, namely human and dogs, use the same genes for these social behaviors.”

However, some experts think the study needs to be expanded to more dogs and wolves to be sure of the conclusions. With so few individuals “the associations are at most suggestive at this point,” Jensen says. Kikusui suggests they look for this gene-behavior connection in other populations of dogs and more individuals.

•  From another study:

Being friendly is in dogs’ nature and could be key to how they came to share our lives, say US scientists.

Dogs evolved from wolves tens of thousands of years ago. Dogs were domesticated from wolves between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago.

This process began when wolves that were tolerant of humans sneaked into hunter gatherer camps to feed on food scraps. Over the course of history, wolves were eventually tamed and became the dogs we know today, which come in all shapes and sizes. The finding of genetic changes linked to sociability in dogs shows how their friendly behavior might have evolved.

During this time, certain genes that make dogs particularly gregarious have been selected for, according to research. This may give dogs their distinctive personalities, including a craving for human company.

“Our finding of genetic variation in both dogs and wolves provides a possible insight into animal personality, and may even suggest similar genes may have roles in other domestic species .” said Dr Bridgett vonHoldt of Princeton University.

The researchers studied the behavior of domestic dogs, and grey wolves living in captivity. They carried out a number of tests of the animals’ skills at problem-solving and sociability.

These showed that wolves were as good as dogs at solving problems, such as retrieving pieces of sausage from a plastic lunchbox. But captive wolves gave humans only brief attention

Dogs, however, were much more friendly. They spent more time greeting human strangers and gazing at them, while wolves were somewhat aloof (sounds like cats evolved from wolves).

DNA tests found a link between certain genetic changes and behaviors such as attentiveness to strangers or picking up on social cues. Similar changes in humans are associated with a rare genetic syndrome, where people are highly sociable.

The research is published in the journal, Science Advances.

•  Many veterinarians and dog folks may not know about Border Collie collapse, a form of exercise intolerance in Border Collies, Australian Kelpies, and related breeds. Dogs with BCC are normal at rest, but after five to 15 minutes of strenuous exercise, they can develop incoordination and altered mentation.

Two issues of the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association featured a study on exercise in dogs with BCC and a survey on observations of dogs with the condition.

“(BCC) is not rare and is a significant problem in the breed,” said lead researcher Dr. Sue Taylor, a professor of small animal medicine at the University of Saskatchewan Western College of Veterinary Medicine, in the newsletter AAHA NEWStat.

The only treatment for BCC is to avoid strenuous exercise, especially in hot weather, as a form of prevention. Exercise should be stopped as soon as a dog shows the first signs of a collapse, and dogs with signs should be cooled.

Vol. 10, No. 21 – July 19 – Aug 1, 2017 – The Pet Page

Search Dog Trapper lived life to the fullest, enjoying every moment, whether searching for survivors after Hurricane Katrina or playing in the backyard swimming pool. This handsome Yellow Lab crossed the Rainbow Bridge at 15 years old on June 22 with his Handler of nearly 13 years, Marshia Hall, by his side.

•The British Veterinary Association reported nearly 11,000 UK pet poisoning incidents last year, with e-cigarette materials high in nicotine as a threat on the rise. Vitamin D tablet poisonings were also up, with rat poison, chocolate and artificial sweeteners also on the list.

We want to thank Cappi Patterson and Mary-Joe Murphy for these wonderful commemorative cups dedicated to Scamp.

•David Krall nearly died after he was infected with Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a rare bacteria that can be transmitted to people from dog saliva, when he was bitten by a neighbor’s dog, and although he’s recovered, he was left with partially amputated toes, hearing loss and other deficits. Krall’s condition, which was plagued by a series of mistakes and misinformation and was complicated by the fact that his spleen had been removed two decades earlier, left him in a medically induced coma for over a week.

•By Victoria Usher

The sense of fair play is an important human trait, but new research suggests that it’s a key behavior for dogs and wolves as well. This new research with wolves suggests that this aversion to unfairness predates the domestication of dogs. Scientists tested similarly raised dogs and wolves that lived in packs. Two animals of each species were placed in adjacent cages, equipped with a buzzer apparatus.

When the dog or wolf pressed it with their paw, both animals got a reward on some occasions. Other times, the dog or wolf doing the task got nothing while the partner did. The key finding was that when the partner got a high value treat, the animal doing the task refused to continue with it. “When the inequity was greatest they stopped working,” said Jennifer Essler, from the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna. “The fact that the behavior was found in both wolves and dogs helps to overturn the idea that dogs learned this concept because they were domesticated. It makes much more sense to say that this would be something shared from a common ancestor than to say it evolved twice, or to say that it came from domestication.”

Pet dogs are less sensitive to being treated unfairly – probably because of their experience with humans. “I think it’s clear that this is affected by both domestication as well as their life experience with humans because you do see a difference between pet dogs and pack-living dogs,” said Essler.

•Dear Dr. Weldy’s: My fiancé and I have been shopping for a new puppy, but after speaking to some friends of ours, we are blown away at the cost of veterinary care. We don’t think that we’ll move ahead with getting a puppy because the necessary care and surgery costs aren’t in our budget. Why is it so expensive to visit the vet?!

Bremen

Dear Bremen: I’m so glad you asked! You aren’t wrong, and we sympathize with you — veterinary care is not cheap, and unplanned veterinary care can be financially straining. A simple answer to your question would be to say that your veterinarian is part of a business and businesses need to generate income. But, there’s more that we in the veterinary field would like you to know.

This conversation should be prefaced by saying that everyone at your vet clinic cares about your pet. The hustle and chaos may distract from it, but those individuals are extremely hard working and they’ve dedicated their lives to ensuring the betterment of you and your pet’s lives.

The obvious holds true — veterinary clinics are commercial entities with large utility bills and lots of overhead. Additionally, medications, surgical instruments, x-rays, ultrasounds, etc., all cost a lot of money to purchase and maintain. Most importantly, though, vet clinics charge what they charge so that veterinarians, receptionists, nurses, and support staff can continue to keep pets healthy. What many people don’t understand is that the amount of money that a clinic generates rarely reflects the enormous amounts of work, education, sacrifice, blood, sweat, and tears that go into a regular day on the job.

This is well-illustrated by comparing veterinary medicine to human medicine. Veterinarians have very similar training to physicians on the human side — four years of college followed by four years of veterinary school. And many veterinarians go on to specialize, just like medical doctors. That education comes at a price for everyone; vets and physicians graduate with a similar amount of debt (approaching $200,000 for recent graduates). However, veterinarians make anywhere from a quarter to half of what physicians make.

Meanwhile, veterinary nurses and assistants (arguably the hardest working and most caring members of the veterinary team) are also suffering from a large debt-to-income ratio. Though many people are aware of the education required for vets, very few realize that many of the nurses they see at the vet have two-year, and sometimes four-year degrees. Despite their education and on-the-job training, most veterinary nurses make half (at best) of what their human counterparts bring in. The same holds true for all support staff involved. They are all extremely qualified individuals who work very hard to bring you and your animals better lives.

I haven’t pointed all of this out to complain, however. All of us enjoy our work and we’re proud of what we do. We signed up for this. I’ve pointed this out to illustrate that the veterinary team, in many ways, makes a financial sacrifice, so that we can all continue to enjoy the love and fulfillment our animals bring.

Questions for Ask a Vet can be asked either by email to drweldys@frontier.com, by regular mail to Dr. Weldy’s Associates, 114 N. Elkhart, P.O. Box 527, Wakarusa, IN 46573, or by visiting the website at www.drweldys.com.

Vol. 10, No. 20 – July 5 – July 18, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  Estella is a sweet, affectionate 2 year old Pit Bull. She and her human are homeless and are being helped by Buddy Nation. Buddy Nation is a registered 501(c)(3) organization devoted to helping the pets of Ventura’s homeless, including veterinary care.

Estella needs your help

Estella is going lame and losing the use of her back legs. She needs double ACL surgery – Anterior Cruciate Ligament. Her surgery is scheduled for the end of July and will be done by Dr. Ian Holsworth of VetSurg. Although VetSurg has given a discount, the estimated cost will be $6,000. Buddy Nation has raised about half that amount.

Please donate if you can, in any amount. All monies should go directly to VetSurg, marked for Estella/Buddy Nation. VetSurg – 2180, 2859 Loma Vista Road.

•  The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office Detention Services Division launched a new interactive inmate program named ‘R.U.F.F. Road” (Rehabilitation Utilizing Furry Friends) in January ,2017. The 16-week collaborative program allows inmates who are instructed by expert dog trainers to train shelter dogs in preparation for adoption.

The Sheriff’s Office has established a partnership with Pivot Animal Assisted Education Outreach, a non-profit organization that aims to give dogs facing euthanasia at local shelters a second chance by providing them training that makes them more adoptable. The inmates will teach basic obedience, house training, and socialization skills through positive reinforcement.

This program allows inmates a chance to give back to their community by training dogs to be well-behaved American Kennel Club Good Citizen Pets. While the dogs learn good behavior, trust, and skills that improve their adoption chances, the inmate’s gains patience, confidence, self-pride, communication and job skills.

Pivot is one example of many organizations willing to work tirelessly to find and save last chance shelter dogs using inmates in county jails.

On June 21 the Ventura County Sheriff’s office held the inaugural graduation ceremony for the canine training program. The event was held at the Todd Road Jail Facility. The guests of honor were dogs Brando, Buddy, Chance and Lipit.

For more information about Pivot, please visit www.pivotareo.org.

•  Gavel the Puppy (Vice-Regal Dog) and Fair Play

By Victoria Usher

“Can you believe that I was fired because I was too friendly” Gavel

In Queensland, Australia the title of Vice-Regal Dog has been given to a German Shepard puppy who goes by the name of Gavel. He was originally enrolled in a police dog academy with the Queensland Police Service but he was kicked out of the 16-month program early for being too friendly and now he is known as one of the fanciest dogs in the world. Aren’t dogs supposed to be friendly?

Since April of 2016, Gavel has been living at the official residence of the Queensland Governor, where the Governor himself decided to give Gavel a job that was perfect for him and his friendly personality.

“He has outgrown four ceremonial coats, undergone a career change and brought untold joy to the lives of the Governor, Mrs. de Jersey, Government House staff, and the thousands of Queenslanders who have since visited the estate,” the office of Governor Paul de Jersey stated. Since Gavel’s promotion to Vice-Regal Dog became official in February, he has been working hard welcoming guests and playing with tour groups at the Governor’s house and the office at the Governor’s house has also begun posting photos of Gavel’s best moments on social media. “We hope Gavel is with us for a long, long time into the future.”

Proud dogs and trainers at new interactive Ventura County Sheriff’s inmate program. Photos by Michael Gordon

•  16 years old Sherlock Patterson has passed away. A great little Doxie, rescued from a hoarder/breeder, born blind due to inbreeding, but that never stopped him … he raced down the back steps into the yard and traveled to New York and San Francisco without a misstep. Sherlock is very missed by his family – 2 and 4 footed.

Vol. 10, No. 20 – July 5 – July 18, 2017 – The Pet Page

Fotos: Proud dogs and trainers at new interactive Ventura County Sheriff’s inmate program. Photos by Michael Gordon

“ Can you believe that I was fired because I was too friendly” Gavel

From June 29th to July 2 the Seaside Spectacular All Breed Dog Show was held at the Fairgrounds. These are a few of the adorable dogs that showed their stuff.

Estella needs your help.

•Estella is a sweet, affectionate 2 year old Pit Bull. She and her human are homeless and are being helped by Buddy Nation. Buddy Nation is a registered 501(c)(3) organization devoted to helping the pets of Ventura’s homeless, including veterinary care.

Estella is going lame and losing the use of her back legs. She needs double ACL surgery – Anterior Cruciate Ligament. Her surgery is scheduled for the end of July and will be done by Dr. Ian Holsworth of VetSurg. Although VetSurg has given a discount, the estimated cost will be $6,000. Buddy Nation has raised about half that amount.

Please donate if you can, in any amount. All monies should go directly to VetSurg, marked for Estella/Buddy Nation. VetSurg – 2180, 2859 Loma Vista Road.

•The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office Detention Services Division launched a new interactive inmate program named ‘R.U.F.F. Road” (Rehabilitation Utilizing Furry Friends) in January ,2017. The 16-week collaborative program allows inmates who are instructed by expert dog trainers to train shelter dogs in preparation for adoption.

The Sheriff’s Office has established a partnership with Pivot Animal Assisted Education Outreach, a non-profit organization that aims to give dogs facing euthanasia at local shelters a second chance by providing them training that makes them more adoptable. The inmates will teach basic obedience, house training, and socialization skills through positive reinforcement.

This program allows inmates a chance to give back to their community by training dogs to be well-behaved American Kennel Club Good Citizen Pets. While the dogs learn good behavior, trust, and skills that improve their adoption chances, the inmate’s gains patience, confidence, self-pride, communication and job skills.

Pivot is one example of many organizations willing to work tirelessly to find and save last chance shelter dogs using inmates in county jails.

On June 21 the Ventura County Sheriff’s office held the inaugural graduation ceremony for the canine training program. The event was held at the Todd Road Jail Facility. The guests of honor were dogs Brando, Buddy, Chance and Lipit.

For more information about Pivot, please visit www.pivotareo.org.

•Gavel the Puppy (Vice-Regal Dog) and Fair Play

By Victoria Usher

In Queensland, Australia the title of Vice-Regal Dog has been given to a German Shepard puppy who goes by the name of Gavel. He was originally enrolled in a police dog academy with the Queensland Police Service but he was kicked out of the 16-month program early for being too friendly and now he is known as one of the fanciest dogs in the world. Aren’t dogs supposed to be friendly?

Since April of 2016, Gavel has been living at the official residence of the Queensland Governor, where the Governor himself decided to give Gavel a job that was perfect for him and his friendly personality.

“He has outgrown four ceremonial coats, undergone a career change and brought untold joy to the lives of the Governor, Mrs. de Jersey, Government House staff, and the thousands of Queenslanders who have since visited the estate,” the office of Governor Paul de Jersey stated. Since Gavel’s promotion to Vice-Regal Dog became official in February, he has been working hard welcoming guests and playing with tour groups at the Governor’s house and the office at the Governor’s house has also begun posting photos of Gavel’s best moments on social media. “We hope Gavel is with us for a long, long time into the future.”

•16 years old Sherlock Patterson has passed away. A great little Doxie, rescued from a hoarder/breeder, born blind due to inbreeding, but that never stopped him … he raced down the back steps into the yard and traveled to New York and San Francisco without a misstep. Sherlock is very missed by his family – 2 and 4 footed.

Vol. 10, No. 19 – June 21 – July 4, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  SPAN is providing $10 spays and neuters for low income cat and dog friends. In the SPAN Thrift Store parking lot 110 N. Olive St. (behind Vons on Main) Friday, July 14, Please call to schedule an appointment 584-3823.

•  On Thursday, June 22, the Housing Authority of the City of San Buenaventura (HACSB) will accept Pet Sitters International’s challenge to “Make it your business to help pets in need” by joining companies around the globe in opening their doors to employees’ furry, four-legged best friends for the PSI’s 19th annual Take Your Dog To Work Day (TYDTWDay®).

TYDTWDay was established by Pet Sitters International (PSI) in 1999. This annual event urges businesses around the globe to experience the joys of dogs in the workplace .

The Housing Authority of the City of San Buenaventura anticipates 7 dogs to join them on June 22 and has a variety of activities planned to give everyone a fun “paws” at work. For more information on PSI’s Take Your Dog To Work Day, visit www.takeyourdog.com.

•  Dogs and memory by Victoria Usher

The question for researchers in a recent study published in Current Biology is whether other animals besides humans share the ability for episodic-like memory. For their study, the research group in Budapest, Hungary, enlisted the help of 17 pet dogs. The dogs in this study were energetic participants who were all easily trained to imitate a simple action.

After watching their owners perform a series of actions the dogs were given the command “lie down”. Replacing the expectation to imitate with lying down had to be unexpected and the researchers tried to verify this new expectation in two ways. First, the dogs received training until they would reliably lie down after observing the actions. Second, verifying that the dogs acted surprised when they didn’t receive a “lie down” request.

Next, instead of the now expected “lie down”, one minute after the dogs saw the last action they received the command to “do it”. Nose to umbrella, paw on the chair, most of the dogs imitated their owner’s action.

To see if they remembered the action after a longer delay the dogs left the testing area for an hour before coming back for a second try. Many dogs successfully imitated the action again, though fewer then after the one-minute test. These results, one of a handful suggesting episodic-like memory in a non-human species, add to our growing knowledge of the richness of other animal’s mental lives. The dog cognition lab in Budapest is one of many around the world; pups in Connecticut can go participate at Yale University and dogs in North Carolina can help at Duke University. Dogs share our homes and our work, and now we know they might share some of the rich memories of our lives together.

•  RedRover, a national animal welfare organization dedicated to moving animals out of crisis and into care, has a list of summer safety tips for pets to help get families through the warm months.

Surfaces such as asphalt, sand and concrete can burn your pet’s paws. Try to walk your pet early in the morning or later in the evening as the temperature cools down or walk them on the grass. If that isn’t possible, check the ground temperature by placing the back of your hand on the ground for at least 10 seconds. If it’s too hot for your hand, it is too hot for your pet’s paws.

Leaving your pet in your car, even in 70 degree weather, can lead to deadly consequences. A Stanford study found that a car’s interior can heat up by an average of 40 degrees within an hour, regardless of ambient temperature, and 80 percent of the temperature rise occurs within the first half-hour.

Make sure to check your pet’s water dish several times a day, and refill it with fresh, cool water. Ice cubes or frozen broth cubes can be added to encourage them to drink more. Adding wet food to their diet can also keep them hydrated.

In addition to making sure your pet is hydrated, keep them in the shade as often as possible when outdoors. While dogs and cats like to bask in the sun, direct sunlight can overheat them and cause heat stroke.

While pools can be a great way to cool your dog down and prevent heat stroke, chlorine can upset a dog’s stomach and irritate their skin. Watch to make sure they don’t drink more than a mouthful of water, and don’t forget to rinse your dog with fresh water after their swim.

Loud noises can be very scary for animals. Try to keep your pet indoors when you know fireworks are planned. If you can’t, be sure to double-check your gate/fencing to ensure your pet won’t try to escape when startled.

Animals can sunburn too, especially those with short, thin or light-colored coats. Sunburns can be painful, and overexposure to the sun can lead to skin cancer. Ask your veterinarian about animal-safe sunscreens and how to apply them properly.

Food that is stuck to a barbecue after cooking can be too tempting for your pet to resist – licking the barbecue grate can result in serious burns to an animal’s tongue or mouth. Make sure to clean the grill thoroughly and close the lid, if possible.

These are just a few tips to help make the summer months with your pets enjoyable and safe. For more information on RedRover and its programs and services, please visit www.RedRover.orgDogs & Wolves –

Vol. 10, No. 18 – June 7 – June 20, 2017 – The Pet Page

•  On June 10 there will be a wonderful event by the Herman Bennett Foundation to raise funds for our K9 officers in the Harbor. Please see the ad in this issue and plan to attend. The Breeze will be there so stop by to say hello and pick up a tennis ball for your pet.

•  by Victoria Usher

In a case study of one 10-year-old boy with cerebral palsy and his family’s dog, researchers found an intervention program led to a wide range of improvements for the child, including physical activity as well as motor skills, and quality of life. The researchers detailed the child’s experience in the adapted physical activity intervention program in a case study just published in the journal Animals.

Co-authors are Monique Udell of the OSU College of Agricultural Sciences; Craig Ruaux of the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine; Samantha Ross of the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences; Amanda Tepfer of Norwich University and Wendy Baltzer of Massey University in New Zealand.

Children with physical disabilities such as cerebral palsy spend less time participating in physical activity compared to their peers. Researchers designed an intervention where the family dog would help improve the child’s overall physical activity, motor skills and quality of life. After researchers and a veterinarian did separate assessments of the child and a year-old Pomeranian for participation, they began the eight-week intervention, which included a supervised physical activity program once a week for 60 minutes and participation such as brushing the dog with each hand; playing fetch and alternating hands; balancing on a wobble board; and marching on a balancing disc.

The child also wore an accelerometer to measure physical activity levels at home. Researchers re-assessed the child after the intervention and found that his quality of life had increased in several areas such as emotional, social, and physical health. Based on the initial positive results, researchers hope to pursue additional studies involving children with disabilities and their family dogs.

•  From Dogtime.com

Pet owners searching for an apartment know it can sometimes be difficult finding a landlord willing to rent to you and your dog or cat. But once you find the perfect place, there are certain precautions you should take before signing your name to a lease and moving in.

Landlords are not necessarily skeptical of people with dogs or cats. Responsible pet owners are usually responsible tenants, and landlords who permit pets know they have a larger pool of prospective tenants to draw from — especially ones who are likely to stay longer if they feel their pets are welcomed.

But renters have their own burden. If a landlord is reluctant to rent for any reason, you may have to prove that you and your pet can live within set guidelines and be good tenants.

You should also read and understand the fine print regarding pets — size and weight restrictions, policies about barking, the number of dogs or cats you’re permitted to own — plus security and cleaning deposits you’ll have to pay. In recent years, some landlords have even begun charging pet rent; it’s possible you may be charged $30 a month for your pet, in addition to deposits.

Your ability to prove that you care for your dog may be what gets you through the front door — and it could be what keeps you there.

First, read the lease thoroughly, especially the parts that relate to your pet. Make sure your dog or cat (or parakeet or snake, for that matter) fits within the limits established in the lease. If the apartment only allows small dogs and you own a Golden Retriever or a larger mixed breed, ask for an allowance — and then make sure it’s written into the lease and initialed by you and the landlord. But negotiating might not always work. For instance, if a landlord does not allow a specific breed of dog because it can be known to be dangerous, don’t expect him to stretch the rules.

Be sure that you understand any required deposits. Before moving in, do a walk-through with the landlord to identify existing marks on carpeting or walls. Take photos and attach those to the lease. When you leave, they may help you get back your deposit if you have kept your apartment clean.

The best way to convince your prospective landlord that you and your dog will make good tenants is to bring your dog for a visit when you find the right apartment. Bring along vet records showing that your pet has been spayed or neutered, is in good health, and is up to date on all vaccinations. Show proof that you apply flea medication on a monthly basis. Be willing to put in writing that you’ll keep your dog on a leash when he’s on property and that you’ll pick up and dispose of his droppings; also, that you’ll prevent him from relieving himself in flower beds.

Some of these suggestions come from the San Francisco SPCA, which has had an Open Door Program in place for several years promoting policies and agreements between landlords and tenants. Prospective renters are shown how to write a pet resume and show their dog in the best light. Apartment owners are provided sample pet policies and checklists for screening and recognizing responsible pet people.

“It benefits people who have pets because it means they don’t have to give them up, which benefits shelters, too,” says Christine Rosenblat, a spokeswoman for the San Francisco SPCA.

Vol. 10, No. 17 – May 24 – June 6, 2017 – The Pet Page, Dedicated to Scamp

•  Welcome to our first “Pet Page.” We know that it will never be the same (or personal)without the Professor but we shall carry on in his name. He will be missed forever.

•  The Humane Society of Ventura County is celebrating its 85th anniversary by holding an open house on June 10, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at its Ojai shelter at 402 Bryant St.

Attendees will have the opportunity to get a behind-the scenes look at the shelter, interact with animals, tour the kennels and clinic, meet the staff and learn about different volunteer opportunities.

A variety of local artists and crafts people will have one-of-a kind items available for sale. Attendees also can enjoy refreshments, participate in an scavenger hunt and learn more about how they can make a difference in the lives of animals in need.

Humane Educator Dawn Reily will have her assortment of critters, and humane officers will be on hand to give attendees a look at the responsibilities and duties of protecting animals throughout the county.

Firefly Ceramics will have a booth, and for or a $25 donation to benefit the shelter’s new kennels, and attendees can design their tile to later become a permanent part of the structure.

Also, the shelter’s main attraction – the animals —will be available for adoption. “You never know when you are going to meet your new best friend,” said Franki Williams, the HSVC’s media and marketing director.

The Humane Society of Ventura County is a private, nonprofit organization founded in 1932. It does not receive federal, state or local tax dollars to operate and relies solely on private donations.

•  Upgrade at the Simi Valley Animal Shelter requires kennels to be emptied! They are holding a “CLEAR THE SHELTER” adoption promotion until June 5th for all dogs. This promotion does not include the cost of a $20 license.

As always, adoption promotions do not guarantee the adoption of a pet. Application and Adoption Counseling from a trained VCAS Adoption Counselor are required as a prerequisite to adoption.

•  by Victoria Usher: A discovery was made recently at two elementary schools. Lead has been found in the water system at Emerson Bandini Elementary School and San Diego Co-Operative Charter School 2 who share a campus together. Testing of all the pipes in the San Diego Unified School District will happen soon because of this frightening discovery. This was all uncovered because one of the teachers at the charter school had been noticing that her therapy dog had not been drinking from a bowl filled with water from one of the classrooms. The teacher soon realized that something was wrong after looking and seeing that there was a sheen on the water. The district sampled a bunch of water outlets around campus after that and discovered that it was contaminated. I think we should all give a giant thank you to that teacher’s therapy dog!

•  Are these skydiving dogs poachers’ worst enemies? Meet Arrow and his handler, Henry Holtshyzen. Harnessed together, they take off across the vast wildlife preserve in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Arrow seems unperturbed, even as they hurl themselves out of the helicopter, falling more than 6,000 feet to earth — and landing in the middle of the poaching wars.

“Getting the dog to the frontlines as fast as possible is always a challenge and parachuting and rappelling is one of the ways of getting dog boots on the ground where they are needed,” Holtshyzen says.

These elite dogs are trained to immediately sniff out the poacher, rushing to attack, pinning the poacher to the ground until more help arrives.

The dogs are up against up against highly-trained, heavily-armed poachers who run a multimillion-dollar industry trading in elephant and rhino horn. In the past seven years, a third of Africa’s elephants have been wiped out.

Nearly 100 of these sky diving dogs have been placed in game reserves across Africa. In one region, they caught more than 100 poachers in 18 months. One dog, Killer nabbed more poachers than rangers equipped with the latest high tech weapons.


On May 9 Ventura Fire responded to a residential structure fire, the first arriving engine company reported heavy smoke showing from the first floor of a two-story single-family residence in the 600 block of Tarlow Ave. The occupants were out but the family dog was unaccounted for. The missing dog was located within the residence, having been overcome by smoke. It was successfully revived by fire personnel at the scene using pet-specific oxygen equipment.


Landon the Sheltie, a canine resident of Thousand Oaks, has had an amazing life of adventure and positive influence. After having a rough start as a young dog, Landon not only became a model and actor, but also had his own community education platform, led charity events, and became a certified therapy dog. Landon’s latest project though is particularly impressive, as he was recently appointed as the “Wellness Ambassador” for ISD Innovations—a Newbury Park-based nonprofit organization dedicated to projects that improve mental health and well-being.


National Police Dog Foundation’s The NPDF’s 2016 K-9 Hero of the Year, Edo, retired last month after 6 years of faithful service to the Los Angeles PD Metropolitan Division. The 8-year-old Belgian Malinois assisted with all armed suspect searches along with his handler, Officer Huynh. In March 2016, he was named the NPDF’s K-9 Hero of the Year for his courageous role in raiding a home involved in a hostage situation.

Vol. 10, No. 16 – May 10 – May 23, 2017 – Professor Scamp Ph.D

In Remembrance of Scamp 2002-2017


Hi Sheldon and Diane

I just wanted to tell you how sorry I am about your baby boy. I know how much you guys love him and what a great pet editor he was. Now that he’s crossed the rainbow bridge, I hope you can find comfort in his memories, adorable pictures and fame.

It’s never ever easy – I’m really sorry for your loss and I hope your hearts heal soon.

Breezy Gledhill


Never easy … big hugs to all of you.

Jennifer Young


I am so sorry to hear that Scamp isn’t doing well. I’ve seen him over the years as well as you at dog events around town. It’s so hard to know he could be gone soon, he will take a big piece of your heart with him.

Know he  loves you in only the way a dog can love: unconditionally.

Take care Scamp fan Fritz


If it should be that I grow weak,
And pain should keep me from my sleep,
Then you must do what must be done,
For this last battle cannot be won.

Don’t you wish that you had voted for Scamp now?

You will be sad, I understand;
Don’t let your grief then stay your hand.
For this day more than all the rest,
Your love for me must stand the test.

We’ve had so many happy years –
What is to come can hold no fears.

You’d not want me to suffer so;
The time has come, so let me go.

Take me where my needs they’ll tend
And please stay with me until the end.

Hold me firm and speak to me
Until my eyes no longer see.

I know in time that you will see
The kindness that you did for me.

Although my tail its last has waved,
From pain and suffering I’ve been saved
Please do not grieve – it must be you
Who had this painful thing to do.

We’ve been so close, we two, these years
Don’t let your heart hold back its tears.

Sent by Patty Jenkins Poem is by an unknown author


Hi Scamp,

We’re sorry you’re not feeling well. We know how it feels to be special (mommie & daddy had to get special permission at The City Center for us to live there) and how sad your mommie & daddy must be right now.

We really hope you get well.

Bono, Lizzy & Emma


Dear Diane & Sheldon

Scamp was a wonderful dog and I know brought you lots of joy. He had a great full life. I could tell because he was so happy. All the best.

Beth, Ella & Clare


Dear Diane & Sheldon

Scamp was an amazing dog who touched all of our hearts. He will never be forgotten. Always here for all of you. Love the Bakers


You’re in our thoughts.  We know Professor Scamp was a very special part of your family and brought you many years of cherished memories.

Canine Adoption and Rescue League


I just wanted to give you my condolences on Scamp’s passing. Me and my girlfriend fell in love with Scamp and his column. It’s clear to me he was well loved by all, as all dogs should be, and he will be missed.

Manny Reynoso


I am so so sorry.   My love to you all … please kiss Scamp goodbye from me.   I am having something made in his honor

Cappi Patterson


Mr. Kitty helped Myrna Cambianica (and hubby) get over the grief of losing their cat.

Sheldon, I am so very sorry to hear of the loss of your furry family member. …

Kat Merrick


So sorry Sheldon. I know how it feels.

Barbara Hinton


Oh I’m so sorry Sheldon and Diane I know how much you love him❤I know how hard it is.

Mindy Benezra


Sorry to hear about Scamp.  I know you two were close.

George Robertson


Sheldon:

As a pet owner (have lost 2) I wanted to tell you I’ve shared your grief. There is nothing in the world to compare to unconditional love of a pet.

Miss Scamp but hope you will soon share love with another.

Jean Nussman.


Scamp by Cheryl Gooss

I’m sorry to hear that Sheldon.

Rebecca Wicks


Sheldon and Diane, So sorry … it is very sad, losing a beloved pet.

James Gray


I am so sorry for the loss of your friend. I feel your dismay.

Shirley Lorraine


Thank you for letting me know.  Please know my thoughts and good wishes are with you

Pam Baumgardner


Dear Sheldon,

I am sorry. I know what it is to say goodbye to a friend like Scamp. hugs and love to you and Diane.

Elizabeth Alvarez


Awwww! Sorry to hear such a sweet dog. We will all miss him. I know you are down now so anything I can do to help be glad to do it.

Richard Lieberman


The little guy had a great life with you folks. Letting him check out while it’s still great is the biggest favor you can do for him.

Alfred Lewis


So sorry Sheldon. It is so rough going thru that. Ugh. Thinking of you both and Scamp. End of an era!

Johanna Spinks


So sad to read of Scamp’s not-so-good health. Losing a pet has often been harder for me than losing a person. I’m sure you know the drill well – we try and do the best thing for our beloved pet when the time comes. The bottom line is quality of life. Never about us.

Best regards,
Kurt Triffet


Scamp by Ana Baker

I can’t quit crying!!! Wish I could say goodbye to Scampy but I’d probably drown him. My heart goes out to all of you!

Ana Baker


I’m so sorry…… Truly understand. Been there. Think about all the fun times (I guess that’s what makes it sad) and all the memories he left with you.

Aloha Champ……
Larry Dote


We went through this after the death of a cat and my husband said maybe not for a while. I missed the companionship so went to humane society and came home with Mr. Kitty.  He is much loved and by both of us. It is always a hard decision on how soon. Animals are so good for our well-being … and we are good in their lives – albeit shorter than ours.

Will be thinking of you and your wife.
Myrna Cambianica


James Mumsford, an American teacher and composer, perhaps described the Shih Tzu best: “Nobody knows how the ancient eunuchs managed to mix together: a dash of lion, several teaspoons of rabbit, a couple of ounces of domestic cat, one part court jester, a dash of ballerina, a pinch of old man, a bit of beggar, a tablespoon of monkey, one part baby seal, a dash of teddy bear, and, for the rest, dogs of Tibetan and Chinese origin.” The object of Mumsford’s colorful description, the Shih Tzu  is a small, regal dog with long, abundant locks; a distinctive face that melts many a heart; and a friendly attitude. The breed can boast a classy background: he was originally kept by royal Chinese families during the Ming Dynasty. With his flowing hair sweeping the ground and his topknot elegantly tied, the Shih Tzu does appear snobbish, suited only for lying about a palace on silk pillows. Nothing could be further from the truth, however. Shih Tzus are beautiful, but they are also friendly, lively, devoted companions. The Shih Tzu personality is enormously appealing, and even grudging dog observers find it hard to resist this breed. The Shih Tzu simply doesn’t allow anyone to ignore him. He was bred to be a friendly companion — he doesn’t hunt, herd, or guard — and that’s what he is.

He loves nothing more than to meet and greet friends and strangers alike. Count on a Shih Tzu to make friends wherever he goes. Not only is this member of the Toy Group good-natured and friendly, he is highly adaptable. He is as well suited to apartments in the city as to life on a country farm. He loves children and gets along with other animals. Interestingly, the Shih Tzu is sometimes called the Chrysanthemum Dog, a nickname that describes the way the hair on his face grows out in all directions — he looks like a flower with a nose for the center.

Legends regarding the Shih Tzu abound. One says that Buddha traveled with a little dog fitting the description of a Shih Tzu. As the story goes, one day, several robbers came upon the Buddha with the intent of robbing and murdering him. The little dog changed into a ferocious lion and ran off the robbers, saving Buddha’s life. The lion then turned back into a fun-loving little dog, which the Buddha picked up and kissed. The white spot on the heads of many Shih Tzus supposedly marks the place where Buddha kissed his loyal friend.