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Dr. Janis Shinkawa selected as finalist for Woman Business Owner of the Year

“Our chapter is proud and excited that one of our members is a finalist.”

The National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) has announced the finalists for the 2017 Woman Business Owner of the Year Award. Among thousands of members, Dr. Janis Shinkawa, co-founder and medical director of Ohana Pet Hospital in Ventura rose to the top of the outstanding field along with two other national finalists, NAWBO members Kimberly Baeth of Golden Openings, Urbandale, Iowa and Kim Heathcott of Clarion Security, Memphis, Tennessee.

“NAWBO members set the bar high in all their endeavors.  We look forward each year to recognizing a woman business owner that embodies the entrepreneurial spirit and continues to push the limits of what is possible,” said Kathy Warnick NAWBO National Chair.  “NAWBO is proud to be the unified voice of all women business owners.  The three women we recognize this year represent the diversity of industries and interests we support through NAWBO programs.  Even though they come from different sectors of industry, their desire to build a thriving business and give back to others unites them and makes them worthy of distinction.”

“Our chapter is proud and excited that one of our members is a finalist for this prestigious award,” said Elaine Hollifield, NAWBO Ventura County President and owner of Hollifield Creative. “Dr. Jan and everyone at Ohana Pet Hospital have earned and deserve every accolade. They are wonderful role models for a successful business that contributes greatly to our community.” Dr. Shinkawa was nominated by NAWBO California Board Member and Past President, Ventura County Chapter Diane de Mailly of DDM Metering Systems.

The NAWBO  recognizes a NAWBO Member who excels at strategy, operations, finances, problem-solving, overcomes adversity and gives back to her community. NAWBO leadership will present the distinguished award during the Annual Awards Gala on October 17 in Minneapolis. The Awards Gala will conclude the National Women’s Business Conference.

Founded in 1975, the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) is the unified voice of America’s more than 9.1 million women-owned businesses representing the fastest growing segment of the economy. NAWBO is the only dues-based organization representing the interests of all women entrepreneurs across all industries. NAWBO develops programs that help navigate women entrepreneurs through the various stages of their business growth. www.nawbovc.org.

Channel Islands “Live Dive” at the Ventura Townehouse

Explore the ocean floor

Come and enjoy live broadcasting in Real-Time as Kelly Moore, National Park Service Ranger, deep sea dives the Channel Islands National Park as we watch her on Ventura Townehouse’s three big screen TV’s.

Using Channel Island’s wireless technology we will be able to speak directly to Kelly as she shows us around the ocean floor allowing us to view wildlife, plants, and its ecosystem and get answers to our questions all in the comfort of our own chairs.

Developed in partnership between Channel Islands National Park and the Ventura County Office of Education, Channel Islands “Live Dive” is bringing the park to the people by providing a real-time underwater experience.

“Live Dive” is open to the public. This invitation is for all Ventura seniors 55 years and older and admission is free. This event will take place on the September 20th, at 1:30 PM in the dining room lounge. You don’t want to miss this!

The Ventura Townehouse is located at 4900 Telegraph Road. All guests please RSVP to Samantha, as seating is limited 642 3263.

The Annual California Coast Classic (CCC) Bike Tour

Join the riders at San Buenaventura State Beach. Photo by Murray Robertson from 2016

The Annual California Coast Classic Bike Tour is one of the Arthritis Foundation’s top fundraising events, whose goal is to raise over $1.2 million. Funds raised support the Arthritis Foundation’s mission to conquer the disease by spreading awareness and raising money for research. Arthritis affects over 50 million adults, or one out of five, and 300,000 children nationwide.

The Arthritis Foundation’s California Coast Classic Bike Tour is a scenic bike ride that takes place over 8 days and is estimated to cover an additional 45 miles over 2016 and 2700’ of elevation over the course of the tour. The Tour starts in San Francisco and ends in Pacific Palisades with a stop in Ventura.

The Tour will be coming through Ventura and you’re invited to meet the riders, volunteers and staff. Join the riders at San Buenaventura State Beach Day 7, Friday, Sept. 15.

Where they will camp out. Festivities include CCC Social Hour (4-6 p.m.), dinner (6:30 p.m.) where there will be great opportunities to interview riders and tour staff.

The next day, Saturday, Sept. 16, the last day of the tour cyclist will have breakfast (6:30-8:30 am) and then ride 55 miles and climb 1,800 feet of rolling hills along the gorgeous coast into Malibu, and cross the finish line at 2 p.m. as a group in Pacific Palisades to fanfare and an emotional welcome.

For more information on the California Coast Classic Bike Tour, visit californiacoastclassic.org.

The Ventura Family YMCA celebrates 130 years

“The Ventura Family YMCA is more than a gym, it’s a place of community.”

The Ventura Family YMCA opened its doors on September 30, 1887 in a house on the corner of Santa Clara and Oak Street. The Ventura Family YMCA was then known as the YMCA of Ventura County. In the 1940s the Ventura Y relocated to a log cabin across from the old Mound School and in 1952 moved again after purchasing the old Mound School. In 1981, the Y bought their current building on Telegraph Road, allowing for the expansion of its fitness and wellness programs.

In 1988 a 3,000 square foot natatorium was added with two heated indoor pools allowing an aquatics program to flourish and serve 5,000 children annually. Today, the Ventura Family YMCA serves 6,000 facility members and provides childcare to over 300 children in its after-school programs. With continuous membership and program growth the Y is once again researching expansion options to ensure it can meet the community needs.

“The Ventura Family YMCA is more than a gym, it’s a place of community and at the Y, strengthening community is our cause,” explains Amy Bailey Jurewicz, Executive Director of the Ventura Family YMCA. “As the needs of the community have shifted dramatically over the past 130 years, our mission has shifted as well. Although much has changed since the Y opened in 1887, the commitment to the cause has never wavered. The Y truly offers something for everyone; a wide variety of health and wellness classes, and scholarships for those who need them. “

To celebrate the 130th year, the Y is offering a gift to the community; join the Ventura Family YMCA by September 30 and get the first month free!

The Y is the nation’s leading nonprofit committed to strengthening communities through youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. The Channel Islands YMCA serves over 46,000 individuals and provides over $1.3 million in financial assistance to families in need for child care, YMCA memberships, away and day camps, youth sports, and teen after-school programs. For more information about the Ventura Family YMCA, visit http://www.ciymca.org/ventura/ or call 642-2131.

Main Street Meats & Real Food Market a Ventura legacy

Sharon and Isaiah carry on a legacy. Photo by Michael Gordon

by Jennifer Tipton

Located at 3049 E. Main St., this landmark has long been known as Ventura’s original and most loved butcher shop.

Opening in the 1920’s it was originally known as “Triangle Park Market” referring to the nearby intersection of Thompson, Main, and Telegraph Rd. Briefly leased as a restaurant it opened again as a butcher shop known as “Bud’s 101 Market”, back then Main Street was Hwy 101!

Frank Rea took over in the 1950’s and it became our beloved “Frank’s Market”, with son Mike as successor.

In 2012 Frank’s Market suddenly closed and Ventura held its breath … where we will get those amazing spencer steaks? Rumor was Frank became ill … truth is Mike simply retired.

A local rancher with over 17 years of experience, Sharon Palmer bought the business and after extensive remodeling re-opened as “Main Street Meats” in 2013.

Three of her kids, Jazmin, Shannon and A.J. work for their mom. Other employees include Aldo, Alexa and Isaiah with Future Farmers of America learning the trade.

The meat all comes from local ranchers and is organic, no dyes, no artificial preservatives or hormones, never been packaged or frozen. Much of the meat is dry aged which is the natural way to care for fresh meat, just as the butchers of days past used to hang it. “The problem with local grocery stores,” according to Sharon, “is the meat is cut and packed and never allowed to do what it’s supposed to do.”

Customers can order preferred cuts (like those spencer steaks), but the meat case has a variety of choices such as gorgeous steaks, chops, ribs and some incredible specialties – teriyaki beef short ribs, chicken artichoke feta sausage or sundried tomato, spinach and goat cheese stuffed chicken. There are a variety of custom burgers not found anywhere else such as the bacon burger with beef and bacon ground together. The ultimate burger is a combo of ground tri-tip, brisket and sirloin and all meat is ground fresh daily. Bulk Boxes are available ranging from 20-40 pounds with choices of beef, pork or the forager (combo) pack.

Sharon also does specialty side dishes for holidays, there was “Man Candy” for Father’s Day.

There’s also a full deli with assorted sandwiches etc.… and smoked tri tips, chickens, ribs and turkeys available to purchase. Selections change frequently.

Specials are offered every weekend. By entering your cell phone number, you’ll receive text messages notifying you of the current deal. Deals include $10 off a $50 purchase or a free tri tip with purchase of a bulk box and additional 5% discount if you pay cash. Sharon says, “Fees for small merchants are high, I’d rather give my customers that discount.” Checking in each visit earns future discounts of $5 to $10.

Main Street Meats also calls itself “a Real Food Market” and rightly so because there is local produce and products including Blue Ridge honey, Ventura’s Coffee and Earls Gone Wild BBQ sauces and marmalades. Sharon says, “You’ve got to be part of the neighborhood and support small businesses.”

She also shared, “To me, if you don’t give to the community, how do you expect the community to give back to you?”

Sharon gives generously to the City Center, Future Farmers of America and the Ventura County SELPA project, which provides disabled kids a chance to work in the market every Wednesday.

Main Street Meats & Real Food Market carries on the legacy of Frank and Mike Rea.

For more info check the website: MainStreetMeatsVentura.com.

Knit-a-thon for Alzheimer’s benefits memory care residents

Teresa Valko and Lois Perry offer an afghan to a Greenfield Care Center resident.

by Lori Harasta

Eighty participants knitted and purled together to raise money for research on “The Longest Day”, an Alzheimer’s fundraising event that took place at Anacapa Fine Yarns in Ventura on June 21.

The event was the brainchild of a couple of women with two things in common: knitting and Alzheimer’s. Teresa Valko has numerous family members who have suffered and succumbed to the disease; Lois Perry’s husband has had increasing symptoms since just after he turned 50.

It began as bonding over the clicking and clacking of needles, and progressed to a deeper friendship as they learned about the pain of each others’ experiences with Alzheimer’s.

These are not ladies that swoon at challenges. They used their ingenuity and balls of yarn to stage the first annual Ventura County “Knit-a-thon” to raise research funds to end Alzheimer’s, a horrible disease that has touched virtually everyone’s lives. It is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States; the 5th in California. They were hoping to raise $10,000.00. They raised over $17,000.00. It was such a success that Teresa looks forward to rolling it out across the state and the nation.

Last month, with assistance from Administrator Stacy Christianson and Facility Liaison Sandra Smith, Lois and Teresa had the pleasure of donating 40 afghans made on “The Longest Day” to Memory Care residents at Greenfield Care Center in Fillmore.

Needles to say, they received a warm response.

Epilogue: Even if you don’t knit, there are many ways to be part of the solution. You can become an advocate, donate, or join a walk. The next local “Walk to End Alzheimer’s” is Saturday, September 30, 2017 at The Collection at River Park, 2751 Park View Court, in Oxnard. For more information, call Fahim Farag at 494-5200  or email ffarag@alz.org.

Women are at the epicenter of the Alzheimer’s epidemic. Nearly two-thirds of Americans living with Alzheimer’s are women. The Alzheimer’s Women’s Initiative (AWI) is a volunteer-driven community group which aims to educate, honor, expand and advocate.

Join the movement today to wipe Alzheimer’s off the face of the earth. Visit alz.org/mybrain.

The Annual California Coast Classic (CCC) Bike Tour

Join the riders at San Buenaventura State Beach. Photo by Murray Robertson from 2016

Theresa Brees has participated in the CCC multiple times with her husband and sister as “Team Sluggy”. She’s riding again this year, in honor of her 14 year-old daughter Mia, who was diagnosed with arthritis when she was 6, and has been a honoree at the Santa Cruz stop of the tour.

The Annual California Coast Classic Bike Tour is one of the Arthritis Foundation’s top fundraising events, whose goal is to raise over $1.2 million. Funds raised support the Arthritis Foundation’s mission to conquer the disease by spreading awareness and raising money for research. Arthritis affects over 50 million adults, or one out of five, and 300,000 children nationwide.

The Arthritis Foundation’s California Coast Classic Bike Tour is a scenic bike ride that takes place over 8 days and is estimated to cover an additional 45 miles over 2016 and 2700’ of elevation over the course of the tour. The Tour starts in San Francisco and ends in Pacific Palisades with a stop in Ventura.

The California Coast Classic Bike Tour will be coming through Ventura and you’re invited to meet the riders, volunteers and staff. Join the riders at San Buenaventura State Beach Day 7, Friday, Sept. 15.

Where they will camp out. Festivities include CCC Social Hour (4-6 p.m.), dinner (6:30 p.m.) where there will be great opportunities to interview riders and tour staff.

The next day, Saturday, Sept. 16, the last day of the tour cyclist will have breakfast (6:30-8:30 am) and then ride 55 miles and climb 1,800 feet of rolling hills along the gorgeous coast into Malibu, and cross the finish line at 2 p.m. as a group in Pacific Palisades to fanfare and an emotional welcome.

For more information on the California Coast Classic Bike Tour, visit californiacoastclassic.org.

World renowned chalk artists to create sidewalk masterpieces at Ventura Art & Street Painting Festival

Seaside backdrop for Ventura Art & Street Painting Festival to benefit FOOD Share of Ventura County and Kids Arts Inc. At Ventura County’s only chalk art event, more than 40 talented chalk artists will transform Ventura Harbor Village sidewalks into beautiful works of art during the family-friendly Festival, Sept. 9th and 10th from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. This festival is hosted by Ventura County Art Events, Inc.

Visitors to the seaside event will watch as street painters create spectacular chalk pastel murals along the promenade, and enjoy original artwork available for purchase including paintings, sculptures, woodwork and wearable items. Children visiting the festival can also create art on the sidewalk in the Children’s Chalk Area, run by local group Kids’ Arts, Inc. For $10, children will receive a small box of their own chalk and a sidewalk square where they can create their own masterpiece.

This year, the festival welcomes two world-renowned chalk artists. Ventura resident Tracy Lee Stum, an internationally recognized American street painter and author of “The Art of Chalk”, and Rod Tryon, a Santa Barbara resident who has been street painting for 30 years and has been featured in numerous events in the U.S. and abroad.

Stum, who was the official artist for the US House at the 2010 Winter Olympics, is also known for her chalk artwork at the Super Bowl XLIX game.

“For me, street painting is absolutely the most joyful form of creative expression I have engaged in,” says Stum. “An event like the Ventura Art and Street Painting Festival is so important because it keeps art alive in our community.”

A veteran street painter, Tryon has been featured in numerous street painting events as well as a documentary film entitled “Life Beyond Earth” and a music video for iCarly’s Miranda Cosgrove.

Complimentary rides to the festival are available on the Downtown-Harbor Trolley from California Street, Pierpont neighborhood, and hotels along the waterfront.

Event information:http://www.venturaartfestival.com/ or VenturaHarborVillage.com.

New League of Extraordinary Women kickoff unites local women

Sue Osborn, Bonnie Atmore, Judy Warner, Betsy Chess and Marsha Bailey are extraordinary women .

Women’s Economic Ventures (WEV) hosted a group of influential women leaders from Ventura County at the kick off of their new League of Extraordinary Women held at the Atmore Ranch on Tuesday, July 25th. More than 50 guests gathered at the ranch to hear several speakers discuss how the new group will help to strengthen women-owned businesses and elevate women in our community.

“This was an extraordinary evening for all of us,” said Citycouncil Member Cheryl Heitmann, a co-chair of the event who serves on WEV’s Board of Directors. “The outdoor setting was beautiful and the information shared was important. While women now own 36% of all businesses, 71% of those businesses generate less than $25,000 in annual revenues. We need to support women in our community so they can be more successful.”

Already including more than 40 members, WEV’s new League of Extraordinary Women will provide an opportunity for members to meet and combine their efforts and resources to help strengthen women-owned businesses and elevate women in our community.

Along, with Heitmann, the event was co-chaired by WEV board member Elena Brokaw, hosted by Bonnie Atmore and featured Penny Henschel, owner of Ever After Designs, a WEV client business. Henschel, who has been participating in WEV’s business consulting program Thrive in Five® for 3 years, is a perfect example of the type of business owner the League is working to help. “Since joining Thrive in Five® my gross income has nearly tripled” said Henschel. “I’m in my third location and have gained some really great corporate clients. I like to say this is where preparation meets opportunity.”

Marsha Bailey, Founder and CEO of WEV also spoke at the event. “Women entrepreneurs have the capacity to grow U.S. GDP by 9 points or more,” said Bailey. “Unfortunately, neither our government nor private investors are banking on women in a big way so we must find other means to get them the capital and support they need. The League provides its members a great way to lend their voice, guidance and financial support to promote women’s business success.”

The League of Extraordinary Women is for business executives, entrepreneurs, professionals, artists and philanthropists living and working in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties. To find out more about how to become a member, contact Danelle Coyle at 456-2347 or dcoyle@wevonline.org.

Since 1991, WEV has provided business training and consulting to over 14,000 women and men throughout Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, and made more than $4 million in loans, assisting over 4,000 local businesses. WEV is a U.S. Small Business Administration’s Women’s Business Center, and a certified Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI).

Photo from left to right: Sue Osborn, Bonnie Atmore, Judy Warner, Betsy Chess and Marsha Bailey.

Combat the dangers of hot weather (even in Ventura)

“This should keep us cool until the margarita’s arrive.”

With summer here and the temperatures rising(even in Ventura), it is important to understand the health risks that excessive heat can bring and know the signs of heat-related illnesses. Older adults and people with chronic medical conditions are particularly susceptible to hyperthermia and other heat-related illnesses. The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, offers advice to help combat the dangers of hot weather.

Heat stress, heat fatigue, heat syncope (sudden dizziness after exercising in the heat), heat cramps and heat exhaustion are all forms of hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is caused by a failure of the body’s heat-regulating mechanisms. The risk of hyperthermia can increase with the combination of higher temperatures, underlying general health, and individual lifestyle.

Lifestyle factors that can increase risk include not drinking enough fluids, living in housing without air conditioning, lack of mobility and access to transportation, overdressing, visiting overcrowded places and not understanding how to respond to hot weather conditions. On hot and humid days, especially when an air pollution alert is in effect, older adults, particularly those with chronic medical conditions, should stay indoors in cooler places. If possible, people without air conditioners or fans should go to places that do have air conditioning, such as senior centers, shopping malls, movie theaters and libraries. Cooling centers, which may be set up by local public health agencies, religious groups and social service organizations in many communities, are another option.

There are many factors that can increase risk for hyperthermia, including:

Dehydration

Alcohol use

Reduced sweating caused by medications such as diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers and certain heart and blood pressure drugs

High blood pressure or other health conditions that require changes in diet. People on salt-restricted diets may be at increased risk; however, salt pills should not be used without first consulting a doctor.

Use of multiple medications. It is important, however, to continue to take prescribed medication and discuss possible problems with a physician.

Age-related changes to the skin such as poor blood circulation and inefficient sweat production

Heart, lung and kidney diseases, as well as any illness that causes general weakness or fever

Being substantially overweight or underweight

Heat stroke is a life-threatening form of hyperthermia. It occurs when the body is overwhelmed by heat and unable to control its temperature. Signs and symptoms of heat stroke include a significant increase in body temperature (generally above 104 degrees Fahrenheit), changes in mental status (like confusion or combativeness), strong rapid pulse, lack of sweating, dry flushed skin, feeling faint, staggering or coma. Emergency medical attention is critical for a person with heat stroke symptoms, especially an older adult.