The Ventura Parkinson’s Disease Support Group

Why a tulip?

Parkinson’s disease is a chronic, degenerative neurological disorder that affects one in 100 people over age 60. While the average age at onset is 60, people have been diagnosed as young as 18. There is no objective test, or biomarker, for Parkinson’s disease, so the rate of misdiagnosis can be relatively high, especially when the diagnosis is made by a non-specialist. Estimates of the number of people living with the disease therefore vary, but recent research indicates that at least one million people in the United States, and more than five million worldwide, have Parkinson’s disease (stats from Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research).

As many as one million Americans live with Parkinson’s disease, which is more than the combined number of people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy and Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease each year, and this number does not reflect the thousands of cases that go undetected.

An estimated seven to 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson’s disease.

Incidence of Parkinson’s increases with age, but an estimated four percent of people with PD are diagnosed before the age of 50.

Men are one and a half times more likely to have Parkinson’s than women.

As many as one million Americans live with Parkinson’s disease, which is more than the combined number of people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy and Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Why A Tulip? On April 11, 2005, the red tulip with a fringe of white was launched as the official symbol of PD at the 9th World Parkinson’s disease Day Conference in Luxembourg.

The Ventura Parkinson’s Disease Support Group is pleased to announce that Dr. Sarah Kempe-Mehl will be presenting “Beyond the Tremor: Living with the Non-Motor Symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease” at their meeting Wednesday, April 12, from 1:00 to 3:00 pm at The Lexington Assisted Living, 5440 Ralston St,. Come participate in a brief round table at the beginning of the meeting.

Dr. Sarah Kempe-Mehl will be speaking from 2 to 3pm. She will be focusing on the non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease and also “Why see a movement disorder Specialist” along with the services available from her practice with Dr. Erin Presant, “Central Coast Movement Disorders Specialists”  which was established in March of 2016 in Santa Barbara. (http://www.movementdocs.com).

Dr. Kempe-Mehl is a board-certified neurologist and fellowship-trained in movement disorders. She subsequently completed a one-year fellowship in movement disorders at Stanford University.

Please check in at the front desk for directions to the meeting room. Extra parking is graciously available across the street from the Lexington in the Baptist Church parking lot. Call 766-6070 for further information. Reservations are not required.

 

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